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Irish Youth Health Promotion Bibliography

This is a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished studies, post-graduate theses, and other research studies related to youth health promotion in the youth work sector in Ireland. We are very grateful to the Health Promotion research centre based in NUI Galway for their support in collating this bibliography of research studies.

This bibliography will act as a foundation for an in-depth evaluation of Irish research on youth health promotion. It will assist in identifying gaps in policy and practice, planning future projects and reduce duplication of research.

Example Searches:

Alcohol , Drugs, Mental Health, Sexual Health, Youth Work , Kildare, Youth

The search results show a summary of each resource. Click on the Title of the resource to see the full information.

Teenager’s views on solutions to alcohol misuse: report on a national consultation.

Full title: 
Teenager’s views on solutions to alcohol misuse: report on a national consultation.
Author: 
Mc Evoy, O.
Year: 
2008
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
Mc Evoy, O. (2008). Teenager’s views on solutions to alcohol misuse: report on a national consultation. Dublin: The Office of the Minister for Children.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
A participative research methodology called ‘Open Space’ was used.
Methodology: 
To explore how young people view teenage drinking and to seek their views on the most effective ways of dealing with excessive teenage drinking.
Participants: 
In five different locations across the country, 257 young people, between the ages of 12 and 18, were consulted. The consultations were framed to seek young people’s views on the solutions to alcohol misuse.
Conclusion: 
There was considerable agreement among participants in all locations on the important areas on which to focus. The top 4 were: the legal age to drink alcohol, alternative alcohol-free facilities, education, and law enforcement. A number of specific and key solutions were also identified and prioritised by the participants using a ‘sticky dot’ voting system. The top 5 solutions emerged as: lower the legal age of drinking alcohol to 16, offer alternative alcohol-free facilities, the importance of the role of parents in setting a good example and being understanding and realistic with their children, age-appropriate education programmes, and an updated and enforced ID system.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
teenagers, alcohol, consultation, solutions
Length: 
87 pages

Mental health & social inclusion; report 36.

Full title: 
Mental health & social inclusion; report 36.
Author: 
National Economic Social Forum (NEFS)
Year: 
2007
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
National Economic Social Forum (2007). Mental health & social inclusion; Report 36. Dublin: National Economic and Social Forum.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To explore the relationship between mental health and social inclusion in terms of: strengthening positive mental health and well-being for the whole population; the impact of poverty and social exclusion on mental health; and access to services and better recovery rates.
Methodology: 
A consultation process with various stakeholders was carried out; including a public call for submissions of documents relating to this area, public seminars and lectures, and consultations with various stakeholders.
Participants: 
Service users and representatives from youth and children’s organisations, representatives of the Scottish National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Well-being as well as other relevant people who attended the public consultations.
Conclusion: 
Young people are identified as one of the six strategic areas for improving mental health and social inclusion. Early intervention initiatives are identified as the key way to achieve this. This report provides examples of good practice with regard to supportive networks and suicide prevention for mental health promotion and social inclusion of youth. It identifies the need to expand education for citizenship in the school system and in the youth and adult education sectors, with the health and well-being benefits of social and community supports emphasised in this work. It also identifies the importance of raising awareness of mental health and offering a referral service for those who need specific support within the substantial network of youth services identified throughout the country.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
mental health, social inclusion, Ireland.
Length: 
246 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Available from the National Economic and Social Forum.

Working with young people: a national study of youth work provision and policy in contemporary Ireland.

Full title: 
Working with young people: a national study of youth work provision and policy in contemporary Ireland.
Author: 
Powell, F., Geoghegan, M., Scanlon, M., & Swirak, K.
Year: 
2010
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
Powell, F., Geoghegan, M., Scanlon, M., & Swirak, K. (2010). Working with young people: a national study of youth work provision and policy in contemporary Ireland. University College Cork: Institute for Social Science.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
This study aimed to examine youth work provision and policy in Ireland.
Methodology: 
Questionnaires and interviews.
Participants: 
Policy-makers, heads of youth work organisations, youth workers and volunteers.
Conclusion: 
This study provides a context to the provision and policy of Irish youth work. It identified that over 43,000 young people participated in youth work groups across Ireland. Youth cafes emerged as one of the innovative youth programmes that help young people make lifestyle changes and also provide them with space to spend their free time. The report identified that young people from many cultures participated in youth groups; however more supports are needed to enable integrated multicultural youth work. This report highlights the differences that exist in Ireland relating to the provision of mainstream and targeted youth work funding, the need for more male youth workers and the need to refocus the aims of some mainstream youth work.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
youth work, provision, policy, Ireland
Length: 
109 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Library access
ISBN: 
ISBN 1906642167

Youth participation and youth work: a conceptual review.

Full title: 
Youth participation and youth work: a conceptual review.
Author: 
Seebach, M.
Year: 
2008
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
Seebach, M. (2008). Youth participation and youth work: a conceptual review. Youth Studies Ireland, 3(2), 37-53.
Publication Type: 
Journal article
Aim: 
To examine youth participation literature and assess how it relates and contributes to youth work practice.
Methodology: 
Literature review
Participants: 
n/a
Conclusion: 
This report concludes that youth work policy and theory in Ireland has embraced youth participation. Following on from the adoption of Article 12 of the United Nations Convention of the Rights of a Child (UNCRC), youth work policy views young people as citizens now.
Keywords: 
youth work, youth participation
Subject Matter: 
n/a
Length: 
16 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Library access

How we see it: children and young people’s views on the implementation of the United National Convention on the Rights of the Child in Ireland.

Full title: 
How we see it: children and young people’s views on the implementation of the United National Convention on the Rights of the Child in Ireland.
Author: 
Tully, N., Brooks, A., & Hanafin, S.
Year: 
2006
Category: 
Context
Citation: 
Tully, N., Brooks, A., & Hanafin, S. (2006). How we see it: children and young people’s views on the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in Ireland. Dublin: The Office of the Minister for Children.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To explore the views of children and young people regarding specific issues relating to the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in Ireland.
Methodology: 
Questionnaire.
Participants: 
Children and young people aged 12 to 18 years (n=117).
Conclusion: 
The data indicate that the majority of young people are aware of their rights under the UNCRC and their right to be heard within society. Young people demonstrated an understanding of the difficulties facing their peers and they believed young people have the potential to make a significant contribution to the lives of others.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
children, views, UNCRC
Length: 
36 pages

Youth mentoring in Ireland: weighing up the benefits and challenges.

Full title: 
Youth mentoring in Ireland: weighing up the benefits and challenges.
Author: 
Brady, B., Dolan, P.
Year: 
2007
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Brady, B., & Dolan, P. (2007). Youth mentoring in Ireland: weighing up the benefits and challenges, Youth Studies Ireland, 2(1), 3-16.
Publication Type: 
Journal article
Aim: 
To review the international body of empirical knowledge in relation to mentoring among youth and, research into the Irish experience of Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS).
Methodology: 
Literature review
Participants: 
n/a
Conclusion: 
Based on Irish and international research, the benefits and challenges associated with the development of youth mentoring in Ireland are identified. It is suggested that implementation of an internationally recognised programme in an Irish context could bring many benefits, but also may present a core set of challenges to social policy in respect of young people who are potentially at risk.
Keywords: 
youth mentoring, social support, prevention
Subject Matter: 
n/a
Length: 
20 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Available from the Child and Family Research Centre, NUI Galway.

Youth as a resource - promoting the health of young people at risk.

Full title: 
Youth as a resource - promoting the health of young people at risk.
Author: 
Burke, S.
Year: 
1999
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Burke, S. (1999). Youth as a resource - promoting the health of young people at risk. Dublin: Department of Health and Children.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To explore the health needs of young people at risk and to detail the approaches used in addressing such issues.
Methodology: 
Meetings and consultations were held with youth, youth workers, policy makers and youth sector managers.
Participants: 
Early school leavers aged 13 to 17 (n=53), national and regional policy makers, management from relevant youth sectors, 262 teachers, youth and community workers, Juvenile Liaison Officers, Youthreach, FÁS and Community Training Workshop trainers, health board personnel (including health promotion staff, social workers, child and family support workers), addiction counsellors, probation and home school liaison officers, local area partnership and crisis service personnel.
Conclusion: 
This report concludes with 6 main recommendations for working towards improving the health needs of young people at risk. It urges relevant agencies to consider the issues contained within the report and its recommendations when formulating and prioritising actions in their work. As the building of healthy public policy and multi-sectoral activity are two of the cornerstones of health promotion, the challenge for health promotion is to pursue the development of these policies with the relevant sectors.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
early school leaving, disadvantaged, educational disadvantage, health risk assessment, Ireland, youth
Length: 
71 pages

Free-time and leisure needs of young people living in disadvantaged communities.

Full title: 
Free-time and leisure needs of young people living in disadvantaged communities.
Author: 
Byrne, T., Nixon, E., Mayock, P., & Whyte J.
Year: 
2006
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Byrne, T., Nixon, E., Mayock, P., & Whyte J. (2006). Free-time and leisure needs of young people living in disadvantaged communities. Dublin: Children’s Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin & Combat Poverty Agency.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To investigate the free-time and leisure needs of young people aged 12-18, living in areas designated as socially and economically disadvantaged.
Methodology: 
A mixed methods approach was adopted including focus group discussions, interviews and questionnaires.
Participants: 
Eighty young people aged between 12 to 18 years & 7 service providers participated. Young people were recruited from post-primary schools, local youth groups/clubs, FÁS Community Training Workshops/Youthreach and Garda Diversion Programmes
Conclusion: 
Four major areas were identified in this report as requiring attention in order to improve the leisure and free time opportunities for young people in Ireland. The report suggests that young people feel ignored and isolated and highlights the need for a mechanism to facilitate consultation with youth regarding changes taking place in the environment. Structured leisure activities were another identified action area. Many clubs are under-funded and a much higher number of youth club/groups were available in inner-city areas compared to suburban areas. With regard to unstructured activities these young people identified that “hanging around” with friends was how they liked to spend their time. This report also found that there was a high uptake in youth clubs that offered “at risk” youth opportunities to complete their education. Age, gender and geographical location were all identified as factors that can impact on a young person’s participation in youth clubs.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
leisure needs, young people, disadvantaged, communities
Length: 
96 pages

Rural youth work in County Wexford.

Full title: 
Rural youth work in County Wexford.
Author: 
County Wexford Rural Youth Forum
Year: 
2000
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
County Wexford Rural Youth Forum (2000). Rural youth work in County Wexford. Wexford: Ferns Diocesan Youth Service.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To establish the existing range and level of resources, activities and services in place for Rural based youth work in County Wexford.
Methodology: 
Questionnaire.
Participants: 
Managers of youth projects and GAA clubs.
Conclusion: 
In summary, this report found that it has the potential to help youth work organisations in rural areas in County Wexford plan appropriately to meet the real needs of young people in relation to recruiting more youth to join, addressing issues relating to social isolation and exclusion, providing training and support and in providing a range of activities and supports.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
audit, rural, youth work
Length: 
52 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Available from the Wexford County Development Board

Needs, concerns and social exclusion: the millennium and beyond. The results of a questionniare investigating the needs of young people aged 10-18 in the New Ross area.

Full title: 
Needs, concerns and social exclusion: the millennium and beyond. The results of a questionniare investigating the needs of young people aged 10-18 in the New Ross area.
Author: 
Forkan, C.
Year: 
2001
Category: 
Needs Assessment
Citation: 
Forkan, C. (2001). Needs, concerns and social exclusion: the millennium and beyond. The results of a survey investigating the needs of young people aged 10-18 in the New Ross area. New Ross Youth & Community Forum.
Publication Type: 
Report
Aim: 
To assess the need for youth-based activities and facilities for those aged 10-18 years in New Ross, County Wexford.
Methodology: 
Focus groups and questionnaires.
Participants: 
One hundred and eight primary school children, 109 post-primary students and youth not in formal education, 80 parents and various relevant stakeholders (e.g. the Gardai, representatives from the Health Board and the schools)
Conclusion: 
This report found that children were likely to be involved in some form of youth activity (e.g. hurling, football), but they were not aware of activities available to them. The findings illustrate that youth would like more activities to be made available, and highlighted a need for accredited youth-work training.
Keywords: 
n/a
Subject Matter: 
youth work, needs assessment
Length: 
75 pages
Public Accessibility: 
Available from the Child and Family Research Centre, NUI Galway.

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